Feb 21, 2015

Video Break!









be inspired to create your own!






“I kept always two books in my pocket, 
one to read, one to write in.” 
                                                                    
                                               – Robert Louis Stevenson







Feb 10, 2015


Wayne Thiebaud (pronounced Tee-Bow) was born in 1920 and is still living today. 

While he was with the Navy, Thiebaud spent time in New York City (on leave) and began painting pastries and other “American” foods -- like pies, ice cream cones, and hot dogs. He was very interested in creating realistic paintings, and he did this by using thick paint in exaggerated colors. When he painted cakes, he applied the paint like a baker would spread frosting. His artwork looks good enough to eat. 

Thiebaud paints from his imagination and from long-ago memories of bakeries and diners. He said, “Cakes, they are glorious, they are like toys.” 





 




 
Ryan finished her painting just in time for her "Cupcake Wars" birthday party!



First graders collaborated on their own book of highly-detailed sweets.









Jan 25, 2015



During the last month we were making our self-portraits.  We learned two ways to make our face by making guidelines or drawing an eye. We took our fingers to measure the width of the eye and moved it around to make the face. After that, we outlined the pencil with a sharpie and then we colored it in with different things like color pencils, marker, paint, and crayon. It took us a few tries to make the face we want and then when we made the one we wanted we stuck with it! We turned it in to what we wanted it to look like. Now we are putting it in to the yearbook. - Jocelynn T., 5E













 

 

















Face Proportions Using the Guidelines

Everyone's face is slightly different, however, certain guidelines can be used to map out the features
making it easier to draw a portrait with realistic looking proportions. 
Learn more about Proportions of the Face.





Face Proportions Using the Human Eye

Inspired by Jack Hamm, we can use the eye as a unit of measurement. Draw a basic eye shape 
on the left or right side of your paper, approximately half way down the paper. Then based on the measurements 
of that eye, you can place marks for the other eye, nose, bottom lip, chin, jawline and then the entire face shape.

 







" Always remember that you are 
absolutely unique
Just like everyone else. "
                                                           - Margaret Mead